Author Archives: Alibhai

Look out for flood-damaged vehicles when buying a used car

18 Sep 17
Alibhai
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They say public speaking is most people’s biggest fear. Right then must be purchasing a used car. It can be a harrowing trip. The old stereotypes are ever-present. Predatory curbside salespeople peddling poor item. Unsuspecting buyers whose fantasy cars become lemons seconds when they leave the lot. Unusual mark-ups, undetected damage, trouble with the name — all of these are pitfalls that unwary drivers can fall into.

Now there’s another factor to consider: flood damage.

Hurricane Harvey has done its worst, causing carnage and suffering. The automotive side into the catastrophe is an estimated 500,000 to 600,000 flood-damaged vehicles will be write-offs, according Solera Holdings Inc., a data firm based in Westlake, Texas. There have already been 100,000 claims for automobile flood damage. It is a heavy hit to get a town in which 94 percent of the adult population drives.

Most flood-damaged vehicles are deemed total losses by insurers. Sustained water damage causes rust and destroys electrical and computer systems. It may warp brakes and rotors and result in airbag malfunction. Flood damage can corrode the exhaust system and can lead to transmission failure. The “car plus flood equals bad news” list is endless.

Once a vehicle is deemed ruined, it’s delivered to a salvage yard so any undamaged parts can be re-purposed.

Needless to say, where there is calamity, there is criminal opportunity. Flood fraudsters do not waste time. The moment soggy vehicles could be dried out, they are sent off to other areas of the country and sold — with nary a mention of the nautical past — what was called “suckers.” According to the automobile history database firm Carfax, 271,404 flood-damaged automobiles were on American streets in 2016. Guess which state had the most? Texas, with 43,000. Car grifters conceal any information connected to a vehicle’s watery past. They participate in “title washing” by erasing an automobile’s history or by leaving some lingering details off the sheet.

Between Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma, the sector is likely to have “flooded” with much more watery automobiles. It is possible that some of the lemons will end up in Canada. After all, flood-damaged cars made their way here after Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

So, what can a consumer do?

Proceed to a reputable used car dealer. Established traders play the long game. They want happy customers who return, not fleeced marks that hold a grudge. Someone who’s passing off flood-damaged automobiles is going for the quick kill. They are going to pressure you to get fast. There’ll be a few hyped-up narrative describing why the car is really affordable. If you do not act now you will lose it. There might be the inference of the trade being somewhat less than legit (no taxation, cash only). The best way to guarantee a mark will not go to the police is to have them participate in criminal behaviour.

Inspect the vehicle. Start looking for mold and mildew. Despite the best attempts of fraudsters, flood-damaged cars frequently smell like the bottom of a pond that is rancid. Check under the mats, under the vehicle, start looking for moisture from the headlights and from the tool panel. Feel for damp spots and look for water stains. Definitely, the most reliable way is to look at its history. Use a vehicle history company to discover if the car was in any heavy water. You will find detailed advice on the best way best to prevent flood-damaged vehicles online.

When in doubt, bear in mind the adage, “If a deal on a used car is too good to be true, it probably spent weekly submerged in water{}”

Shopping for a new car? Check out the new To see the hottest discounts, rebates and prices on new cars, trucks and SUVs. To receive your price.

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

Revisiting fanciful failures in the past at Pebble Beach Concours

17 Sep 17
Alibhai
No Comments

In the realm of concept cars, the dustbin of broken dreams is littered with mechanical detritus. There are a couple of memorable gems, however, one of those failed projects. One — featured in the current Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance — may even claim to have made guest appearances at three 1960s television series.

The Reactor, a fancifully futuristic 1964 custom coupe, appeared at the first Star Trek collection, on Batman and at the humor Bewitched, in an episode especially composed for thenbsp;car.

1 look at its retro-revolutionary layout lets you know why. This George Jetson-meets-Popular Mechanics mashup looks like it was created by someone motivated by psychedelic drugs. Its pointed platypus snout and wraparound glass, topped off with tail fins, makes it seem a little like a folded paper plane wrought in aluminum. It’s tough to tell whether designer Gene Winfield was seriously trying to project in the future, or if he meant the automobile as anbsp;joke.

It was powered by a turbocharged six-cylinder power plant from Chevrolet’s ill-fated rear-engine Corvair compact, turned around and mounted at the front. The hood, doors, concealed headlights and roof could be managed by remotenbsp;controller.

Equally adventuresome, but perhaps more serious, was the 1967 Gyro-X prototype constructed for a California firm that pictured a production vehicle. Although it had two wheels, this totally enclosed one-passenger apparatus was no motorcycle. It utilized a hydraulically-driven gyroscope to keep it vertical. With the gyro idle in the rest, two training wheels extended to keep it from falling over.

Science amp Mechanics magazine road-tested the model and reported it could reach a top speed of 200 km/h and not tip in turns. However, it never got beyond the prototype phase. Its appearance at the Concours was its first running performance because its recentnbsp;recovery.

Maybe the biggest eye-popper of this dream-car category, however, was the . The famous 1950s singer bought the car to get a shocking (at the time) $150,000 (U.S.) so that he and wife Sandra Dee could roll up to the 1961 Academy Awards in it. Constructed over seven years by Andrew DiDia, it had an aluminum frame, double wraparound windshield and has been painted with 30 coats of Swedish Pearl Essence, supplemented with crushnbsp;diamonds.

Studebaker, a casualty of the 1960s, made the 1962 Sceptre coupe with a plan to put it into production in 1966. Its full-width headlight assembly, designed to minimize glare to oncoming cars, looked like a monobrow in chrome. As the provider’s fiscal fortunes faltered, however, development of the Sceptre wasnbsp;suspended.

The American Dream Cars category is a first in the Concours‘ 67-year history.

Shopping for a new car? Take a look at the new to find the hottest discounts, rebates and prices on new cars, trucks and SUVs. To receive your price.

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

My Kia Sorento makes awful noises when riding over bumps. What can I do?

17 Sep 17
Alibhai
No Comments

Whenever I drive over a bump in the road or maybe a crack repaired with road tar, it sounds and feels like the wheels will come through the floor panel. The Kia dealer’s mechanic tested the car and told me all of the Sorentos have the identical issue. The problem began about eight months ago. All was fine up until then. What can I do? Warren

My study left me with a lot of factors, so I reached out to Larry Morrison, fixed operations manager at 401 Dixie Kia in Mississauga. He guided me to a Kia Technical Service Bulletin (TSB) that I think will you resolve your problem.

TSB #CHA01201402 copes with noises over lumps which were traced back to a small inference involving front strut insulator and the upper strut bearing.

There are two repair solutions.

If the strut itself isn’t noisy and doesn’t have a fluid leakage, then only the top spring pad and front bearing mounts beed to be substituted with upgraded pieces. If the actual strut be leaking fluid or there’s concern that the strut could be the source of the sound, then Kia will replace the whole unit.

Warranty coverage on these items is limited to 100,000 km or five decades.

Lou Trottier is owner-operator of All About Imports in Mississauga. Have a question about repair and maintenance? E-mail , putting “Lou’s Garage” in the topic area.

Shopping for a new car? Check out the brand new To see the most recent discounts, rebates and prices on new cars, trucks and SUVs. To receive your price.

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

Can I get a ticket if I get pulled over and do not have my licence?

12 Sep 17
Alibhai
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If I am driving my wallet and I get pulled over, will I be charged for driving without a license? I thought I had been allowed to make it within 24 hours. Can I save a photo of my license in my iPhone, just in case? — Dorothy, Oshawa, Ont.

Authorities have licence to bill you — or maybe not — if you are driving without yours. However, a photograph on your phone will not help you — at least not yet.

“It is up to the officer’s discretion — you might get lucky,” said Sergeant Kerry Schmidt of the Ontario Provincial Police. “You should surrender your licence when asked to, and a picture wouldn’t satisfy an officer since it may or might not be valid”

Of Ontario’s Highway Traffic Act states all drivers need to carry a license at all times while “in control of a motor vehicle or street car.” There is an $85 set fine. Or, if you are convicted, a judge can choose a fine of anywhere from $60 to $500.

There is nothing in the law which states you’ve got 24 hours to make it. Still, an officer may choose not to charge you, but you need to give your name and address to identify yourself.

Authorities in Ontario can look it up on the spot to find out if you look like your driver’s license photograph on file, Schmidt said.

Still, you are supposed to be carrying your true licence. And you are supposed to hand it over when requested.

“The ministry doesn’t currently accept photographs of licences instead of the actual card,” Ontario’s Ministry of Transportation said in an email announcement. “Therefore, drivers need to carry a drivers license card.”

Selfie control?

And everywhere else in Canada? We checked — every state requires you to carry your license with you. And nobody has a law which lets you use an image of your licence.

But in a few states, including British Columbia and Quebec, authorities might not have the ability to see your driver’s license photograph in their system.

“Will we take a photograph on your phone? Photoshop is a terrific thing, so, no,” said Constable Jason Doucette, spokesman for the Vancouver Police Department. “The most important thing, you need to carry your card. But if the officer wanted to use discretion, [we] could use another photo ID in addition to the police database to identify you.”

The fines vary. As an example, it has $30 and fees in Quebec, $81 in British Columbia and $172 in Alberta.

“You are supposed to have your permit with you,” said Sergeant Audrey-Anne Bilodeau, Sûreté du Québec spokeswoman. “However, it really depends upon the circumstance. Maybe if you’re in a little town the officer might allow you to go home to get it, but there is nothing in the law which states they must.”

And if an officer is not convinced that you are who you say you’re — if you do not understand your zodiac sign, postal code or previous address, say — you might be arrested until you can prove it. “But from my experience on the street, that is really unusual unless it is a criminal matter,” Bilodeau said.

An app for it?

Just how close are we to a driver’s license that would appear on your smartphone’s wallet, like a credit card or concert ticket?

Nobody has one yet. Iowa and Have been in a hurry to be the first American state to provide digital licences.

Following a trial run last year with 100 state employees, Iowa To offer you a licence app statewide prior to the end of 2018.

“We definitely have to have the ability to accept this as evidence of identity and driving privilege where necessary,” Mark Lowe, Iowa interim department of transportation manager, told the Des Moines Register. “Our law enforcement ought to have the ability to interact with it and we need to be able to use it to rent a car, get a hotel room, buy cigarettes, buy alcohol — matters where you’re typically expected to supply some evidence of identity.”

The program shows a licence rotating picture that programmers call the “Harry Potter feature{}” Users upload a selfie that’s verified from their official driver’s license photograph on file.

There are potential problems, though. What if your battery dies? Or, more seriously, what if a crook hacks to the machine and steals your identity? And would you be comfortable handing your phone to authorities?

Idaho, Colorado, Maryland, Wyoming and Washington, D.C. — are a part of a , while many other states are looking into them, along with , in Australia, the Netherlands and Brazil.

And here at home? We checked with every state, and there is nothing formally in the works. “Alberta is open to exploring options for upgraded ways to display a driver’s licence and will consider this as part of future modernization efforts,” Cheryl Tkalcic, Service Alberta spokeswoman, said in an email.

Renewed hope?

Nonetheless, there are several nods to the current here.

Ontario and Newfoundland enable drivers to renew licences online, though you’ve got to appear in person if you will need a new picture. And the licences continue to be sent via the mail.

Both states require renewals every five decades and new photos every 10 years.

Ontario’s 2017 budget announced the acceptance of digital proof of insurance — that can be found in most American states — but no official launch date was set.

There haven’t been statements from any other states, though most say they are considering it.

While they may not replace paper completely, a pink slip in your telephone would mean you would not have to rifle through a nest of newspapers on your glove box if you get pulled over for speeding.

And they are updated automatically each time you renew, make a change to your coverage or proceed.

“Insurance companies are supportive of this because it provides consumers with some choice and convenience — not everyone goes and checks their mailbox on a daily basis,” stated Pete Karageorgos, manager of Ontario consumer and business relations with the Insurance Bureau of Canada. “But we must develop methods that are fraud-proof and protected.”

Have a compelling question? Send it to . Canada’s a big place, so please let us know where you are so we can get the answer for your town and state.

Shopping for a new car? Check out the brand new To see the most recent discounts, rebates and rates on new cars, trucks and SUVs. To receive your price.

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

Revisiting fanciful failures in the past at Pebble Beach Concours

11 Sep 17
Alibhai
No Comments

In the realm of concept cars, the dustbin of broken dreams is littered with mechanical detritus. There are a couple of memorable gems, however, one of those failed projects. One — featured in the current Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance — may even claim to have made guest appearances in three 1960s television show.

The Reactor, a fancifully futuristic 1964 custom coupe, appeared at the first Star Trek collection, on Batman and at the humor Bewitched, in an episode specifically written for thenbsp;automobile.

1 look at its retro-revolutionary layout lets you know why. This George Jetson-meets-Popular Mechanics mashup looks like it was created by someone motivated by psychedelic drugs. Its pointed platypus snout and wraparound glass, topped off with tail fins, makes it seem somewhat like a folded paper plane wrought in aluminum. It’s tough to tell whether designer Gene Winfield was seriously trying to project in the future, or if he meant the automobile as anbsp;joke.

It was powered by a turbocharged six-cylinder power plant from Chevrolet’s ill-fated rear-engine Corvair compact, turned around and mounted at front. The hood, doors, concealed headlights and roof could be managed by remotenbsp;controller.

Equally adventuresome, but perhaps more serious, was the 1967 Gyro-X prototype constructed for a California firm that pictured a production vehicle. Although it had two wheels, this totally enclosed one-passenger apparatus was no motorcycle. It utilized a hydraulically-driven gyroscope to keep it vertical. With the gyro idle in the rest, two training wheels extended to keep it from falling over.

Science amp Mechanics magazine road-tested the model and reported it could reach a top speed of 200 km/h and not tip in turns. However, it never got beyond the prototype phase. Its appearance at the Concours was its first running performance because its recentnbsp;recovery.

Maybe the biggest eye-popper of this dream-car category, however, was the . The famous 1950s singer bought the car for a shocking (at the time) $150,000 (U.S.) so that he and wife Sandra Dee could roll up to the 1961 Academy Awards inside. Constructed over seven years by Andrew DiDia, it had an aluminum frame, double wraparound windshield and has been painted with 30 coats of Swedish Pearl Essence, supplemented with crushnbsp;diamonds.

Studebaker, a casualty of the 1960s, made the 1962 Sceptre coupe with a plan to put it into production in 1966. Its full-width headlight assembly, designed to minimize glare to oncoming cars, looked like a monobrow in chrome. As the provider’s fiscal fortunes faltered, however, development of the Sceptre wasnbsp;suspended.

The American Dream Cars category is a first in the Concours‘ 67-year history.

Shopping for a new car? Take a look at the new to find the hottest discounts, rebates and prices on new cars, trucks and SUVs. To receive your price.

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

What’s the least expensive way to replace my car’s bushing?

10 Sep 17
Alibhai
No Comments

I have been advised that the driver’s side bushing requires replacement in my 2011 Toyota Venza. The part is known as a “knuckle” but it is $500 and you will need to get the entire part, since they don’t replace the bushing. Is there someplace that does take the present bit off and replace the bushing? — James

The information you’re working with is faulty, since the knuckle on your automobile doesn’t have a bushing contained inside.

The knuckle is the focus of the front suspension using the steering tie rod, strut and ball joints attaching to it.

What you are searching for is a common-to-fail bushing located within the front lower control arm.

The internal mounting point of the control arm is connected to the chassis at two points by means of these bushings. The outer end connects to the knuckle through the ball joint.

The suspension is designed to keep the tires in contact with the road surface and has to travel up and down, absorbing road irregularities.

These bushings facilitate this movement.

The easiest of bushings are made from rubber, and as with all parts made from rubber they’ll deteriorate with age.

Unfortunately, Toyota hasn’t made these bushings available separately and the comprehensive control arm has to be purchased.

After-market control arms can be found which will produce the repair cost somewhat easier to consume, but I am unaware of any convenient source for this bushing.

Lou Trottier is owner-operator of All About Imports in Mississauga.

Have a question about repair and maintenance? E-mail , putting “Lou’ s Garage” in the topic area.

Shopping for a new car? Check out the brand new To see the hottest discounts, rebates and prices on new cars, trucks and SUVs. To receive your price.

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

Hachi-roku: Honouring the Soul of Toyota’s celebrated 86??

08 Sep 17
Alibhai
No Comments

In Japan, the honouring of long-dead ancestors is an early and well-established tradition. Lanterns are lit, gravestones are cleansed ritually, and dancing and music welcome the spirits. People who have gone before are still a part of dailynbsp;life.

Which brings us tonbsp;badges.

On the steering wheel, on the front fenders, and etched into the headlights of the bright orange Toyota (that is truly a Subaru, more on that in a bit) is the identical mysterious number: 86. In Japanese, the word for this number is hachi-roku, and it is almost a code word. If you came in a midnight gathering of Japanese car enthusiasts at one of the parking lots that dots the street circling Tokyo, you can immediately join the club by saying nothing else. Hachi-roku. Smiles. Nods ofnbsp;comprehension.

When Scion was about and this little coupe was known as the FR-S, it had 86 composed on its fenders, as a tiny secret handshake to those in the know. To explain the relationship, we’ve summoned an ancestral soul by means of a 1985 Corolla. I understand “Corolla” does not seem very exciting, but hang on to yournbsp;hat.

This is Marvin Ng’s 1985 Corolla GT-S, which he bought for $1,800 in 2000, as a commuter for his first job in L.A.. It’s 305,000 miles on the odometer, and has been sitting in storage for the last couple of decades. As it is a Toyota, it startsnbsp;immediately.

Pop the hood latches open and have a look at the firewall, and you will immediately find the reason behind all this 86 company. There, stamped to steel, is the version code: AE86. In precisely the exact same manner that BMW fans throw around chassis codes such as E30 and E39 as shorthand, Toyota fans know this squared-off hatchback by its numericalnbsp;designation.

In fact, it’s more than simply the Toyota nuts that will have the ability to give you chapter and verse about the hachi-roku. The AE86 is carried high on the shoulders of Japanese automobile culture as a result of its appearance among the central characters in First D, a comedian that broke from Japan in 1995. In a time when monsters such as the third-generation Mazda RX-7 twin-turbo and the Mk IV Toyota Supra Turbo were flexing the might of pan-Pacific muscle, a tiny hatchback was slipping sideways to the imaginations ofnbsp;countless.

The story is pretty straightforward. Takumi Fujiwara is a disaffected teenager who delivers tofu daily in his black-and-white Sprinter Trueno (the Japanese version of the Corolla GT-S). Tricked into creating an almost supernatural driving ability on the winding passes of the fictional Mount Akina, he finally falls in with a bunch of road racers and beats the pants off all kinds of much more powerfulnbsp;machines.

As an underdog story, it has a charm that does not require that you understand anything about ball-bearing turbos or ceramic valve-springs. First D was first a manga (comic), then an anime collection, and finally spawned drivingnbsp;matches.

Ng’s carefully maintained and altered AE86 manages to catch the spirit of the iconic Initial-D vehicle, and is a fairly wonderful machine in its own right. The chassis was fortified with cross-bracing and continues to be stitch-welded in areas for extra stiffness. A newer, 20-valve form of the first 4AGE 1.6L lookup engine was swapped in; it makes around 165 hp and revs to 8200nbsp;rpm.

With four throttle bodies and a 5.5 kg flywheel, the 86’s engine responds instantly to throttle inputs, and has insanely loud as the revs climb above 5,000 rpm or so. It is a little hooligan of a machine, with weighty unassisted steering and a close-ratio gearbox that feels fresh. Everything is a mechanical symphony of clicks and snicks and revs and g-forces. You can just imagine it hurtling down some narrow Japanese sea road in the dead ofnbsp;night.

There is nothing cartoonish about how this car feels. That is fitting, since the legend of the Corolla GT-S goes back farther than Japanese manga, and in the memories of older racing and rallynbsp;motorists.

In 1986, Bob Trinder and his co-driver John Moody handled the completely ridiculous Can-A-Mex rally at a softly prepared Corolla GT-S. The rally started in Vancouver, then hurried to Acapulco, Mexico, up to Anchorage, Alaska, then back to Vancouver, finishing in the Expo ’86 fairgrounds. It contained almost four weeks of racing over 25,000 kilometers of gravel and paved roads, pitting the little Toyota contrary to factory-backed teams such as a former ex-Safari Rallynbsp;winner.

“It was much like the Datsun 510,” states Trinder, speaking from his home in Vancouver. “Some cars come out of the box and they are just perfect. About two-thirds of the way along we were able to pull off the exhaust, but the engine never missed anbsp;conquer.”

They won.

With both racing pedigree and a pop culture after, it’s easy to see why the 86 is something Toyota chooses to observe. But times have changed, and turning a simple shoebox to a winner is not as simple as it once was. The recent Toyota 86 is a collaboration with Subaru, who builds the cars; the Subaru variant is only subtly different, badged as thenbsp;BRZ.

The Toyobaru twins, as some wag dubbed them came in 2011 surrounded with a lot of hype. A shame, as both cars served up only small performance figures. When run head-to-head against something such as a modern Civic Si, the front-wheel-drive car was really faster. Matters were even worse in Subaru showrooms, with the 270 hp WRX parked nearby, for not much morenbsp;cash.

Yet as I pull away and rev the 86’s flat-four engine up to extract the comparatively meagre torque on tap, I can not help feeling that the modern automobile honours the older one in the appropriate ways. It’s affordable. It’s somewhat tail-happy. The existence of back seats and a good trunk make it a more sensible choice than an MX-5. You may run it yearlong — I have driven one of those on snow tires and it was more entertaining than a one-horse open sleigh. There’s a enormous aftermarket to bulge grip levels, and it is a fantastic car for entrance to the track daynbsp;spectacle.

There are hardly any authentic hachi-roku around nowadays, with most having rusted away or been mistreated into bits. However, the 86’s soul still comes to visit from time to time. Light the lanterns. Time to gonbsp;dance.

Shopping for a new car? Check out the new To see the hottest discounts, rebates and prices on new cars, trucks and SUVs. To receive your price.

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

What does a previous accident do to my car’s resale value?

08 Sep 17
Alibhai
No Comments

My car was rear-ended, causing a small crack to the back bumper. The fix was about $5,000 and now my car looks brand new. But when I try to sell it (I will sell privately because I will get more than when I tried to trade it in at a merchant), what will the car history report show? Can it show that $5,000 claim? And does this mean I am pretty much stuck losing that money when I sell that, realistically? — Cole, Edmonton

When you are selling a car that has been in a crash, it’s easy to feel as if you are on the losing side of history.

However, a record of the harm does not necessarily mean that you’ll have a hit for this full amount when it is time to market.

“I had a Tahoe that I scraped a railroad column and had an $1,800 damage claim to repaint the 2 doors,” said Joe Varkey, vice-president of marketing for Carproof. “If I went into a dealership or a respectable body shop and had it repaired, those doors are like new — by no means does this decrease the value of my vehicle by $1,800.”

What exactly does a vehicle history report from Carproof or Carfax — that have been owned by the same U.S. firm since 2015 — really show? It depends upon what they can find.

“To the extent we have this information available, we would report the date of this incident, the price estimated or compensated for the repairs and other expenses, the city and state of the episode, and a few details of the nature of this damage/incident,” Varkey said.

So, your $51.95 Carproof report may show that $5,000 claim. Or it may just reveal the initial quote from the repair shop — that could be lower or higher than the true cost to fix.

When there’s structural damage, the report must show it but it may not, said George Iny, manager of the Automobile Protection Association (APA).

“The reports do indicate when structural damage, but the data isn’t always reliable and moderate structural damage is occasionally missed,” Iny stated.

Missing history?

Services like Carproof are not foolproof, Iny stated. “The most likely mistakes we see would be the wrong point of impact — left back, when it needs to be left {},” Iny stated “[Or] the quote doesn’t have any connection with the damage observed. … it could be inflated compared to the real damage.”

In an investigation four decades back, the APA found that Carproof was more precise than Carfax. Carproof showed about 75 percent of real fixed damage in Ontario and 90 percent in British Columbia, where it included data from the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia. But both missed asserts, Iny stated.

“We have always told people that there is differing amounts of data based on whether it is police-reported,” Varkey said. “The best way to protect yourself is Carproof and a review — so if you are considering purchasing, take it to a trusted mechanic to tell you how well it had been repaired.”

What is your deal?

Even if harm from a fender-bender is repaired perfectly, somebody contemplating buying you car might observe the crash for a means to get a better deal.

That reduction in your car’s value is known as diminished value and while insurance companies in certain American states pay for it, insurers in Canada .

There are diminished-value calculators available — often to get a price — online, which state they reveal what a U.S. insurer might pay out. When there’s no structural damage to the automobile and it is only a panel replacement, then it .

What exactly does any of this have to do with what you can get for your car if you sell it on Kijiji?

Probably not much. Negotiating a selling price is determined by convincing the buyer that the car’s in top shape — and that the damage was minor.

The price is right?

That is what car dealers do. And they are good at it.

“You can go buy a used car in the dealer and they’ll say, ‘Yes, there is this claim but here is the job order and you can see that there’s no structural damage,'” auto appraiser Maurice Bramhall said. “And then they’re going to sell it for a rather normal cost.”

So, once you’re selling it yourself, show the buyer the paperwork in the body shop — if you’ve got it. Even better? Enable them to see themselves that it really was only a crack in the plastic.

“The best would be to demonstrate the buyer photos of the damage before it had been repaired,” Iny stated. “So their creativity does not run wild.”

So, how much of a hit will you’ve got to take?

“It varies case by case back to my case, $1,800 on a Tahoe means a completely different thing than $1,800 on a BMW,” Varkey said. “If I am selling you my Tahoe for $20,000, you might say, ‘It seems like it was painted nicely, but I think you should sell it for $19,000.'”

Supplying the buyer together with the report and inviting them to get an inspection, shows that you are not hiding anything, Varkey said. That goodwill might assist in the discussions, he said.

“You could not be more transparent,” Varkey said.

Disclose for relaxation?

Therefore, if the buyer does not request a history or inquire about mishaps, do you need to tell?

In Alberta, the Fair Trading Act says dealers can not misrepresent an automobile’s history — so if there has been an insurance claim on it, they need to inform you before you sign the contract. But that law does not apply to private sales.

“Private sales aren’t regulated,” said Cathy Housdorrf, spokeswoman for the Alberta Motor Vehicle Industry, the state’s motor vehicle regulator. “But if a dispute occurs, it’ll be a matter for the civil courts{}”

As a private seller, you are not required to volunteer your car’s been damaged in a crash, Iny stated.

“However, if requested by the vendor, they need to answer truthfully or they’d be responsible for the consequences,” he said. “In practice, [that is] difficult to perform.”

Have a compelling question? Send it to . Canada’s a big place, so please let us know where you are so we can get the answer for your town and state.

Shopping for a new car? Check out the brand new To see the hottest discounts, rebates and prices on new cars, trucks and SUVs. To receive your price.????

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

What does a previous accident do to my car’s resale value?

05 Sep 17
Alibhai
No Comments

My car was rear-ended, causing a small crack to the back bumper. The fix was about $5,000 and now my car looks brand new. But when I try to sell it (I will sell privately because I will get more than when I tried to trade it in at a merchant), what will the car history report show? Can it show that $5,000 claim? And does this mean I am pretty much stuck losing that money when I sell that, realistically? — Cole, Edmonton

When you are selling a car that has been in a crash, it’s easy to feel as if you are on the losing side of history.

However, a record of the harm does not necessarily mean that you’ll have a hit for this full amount when it is time to market.

“I had a Tahoe I scraped a parking pillar and had an $1,800 damage claim to repaint the 2 doors,” said Joe Varkey, vice-president of advertising for Carproof. “If I went into a dealership or a respectable body shop and had it repaired, those doors are like new — by no means does this decrease the value of my vehicle by $1,800.”

So what exactly does a vehicle history report from Carproof or Carfax — that have been owned by the same U.S. firm since 2015 — really show? It depends upon what they can find.

“To the extent we have this information available, we would report the date of this incident, the price estimated or compensated for the repairs and other expenses, the city and state of the episode, and a few details of the nature of this damage/incident,” Varkey said.

So, your $51.95 Carproof report may show that $5,000 claim. Or it may just show the original quote from the repair shop — which may be lower or higher than the true cost to fix.

When there’s structural damage, the report must show it but it may not, said George Iny, manager of the Automobile Protection Association (APA).

“The reports do indicate when structural damage, but the data isn’t always reliable and moderate structural damage is occasionally missed,” Iny stated.

Missing history?

Services like Carproof are not foolproof, Iny stated. “The most likely mistakes we see would be the wrong point of impact — left back, when it needs to be left {},” Iny stated “[Or] the quote doesn’t have any connection with the damage observed. … it could be inflated compared to the real damage.”

In an investigation four decades back, the APA found that Carproof was more precise than Carfax. Carproof showed about 75 percent of real fixed damage in Ontario and 90 percent in British Columbia, where it included data from the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia. But both missed asserts, Iny stated.

“We have always told people that there is differing amounts of data based on whether it is police-reported,” Varkey said. “The best way to protect yourself is Carproof and an inspection — so if you are considering purchasing, take it to a trusted mechanic to tell you how well it was mended.”

What is your deal?

Even if harm from a fender-bender is repaired perfectly, somebody contemplating buying you car might observe the crash for a means to get a better deal.

That reduction in your car’s value is known as diminished value and while insurance companies in certain American states pay for it, insurers in Canada .

There are diminished-value calculators available — often to get a price — online, which state they reveal what a U.S. insurer might pay out. When there’s no structural damage to the automobile and it is only a panel replacement, then it .

What exactly does any of this have to do with what you can get for your car if you sell it on Kijiji?

Probably not much. Negotiating a selling price is determined by convincing the buyer that the car’s in top shape — and that the damage was minor.

The price is right?

That is what car dealers do. And they are good at it.

“You can go buy a used car in the dealer and they’ll say, ‘Yes, there is this claim but here is the job order and you can see that there’s no structural damage,'” auto appraiser Maurice Bramhall said. “And then they’re going to sell it for a rather normal cost.”

So, once you’re selling it yourself, show the buyer the paperwork in the body shop — if you’ve got it. Even better? Enable them to see themselves that it really was only a crack in the plastic.

“The best would be to demonstrate the buyer photos of the damage before it had been repaired,” Iny stated. “So their creativity does not run wild.”

So, how much of a hit will you’ve got to take?

“It varies case by case back to my case, $1,800 on a Tahoe means a completely different thing than $1,800 on a BMW,” Varkey said. “If I am selling you my Tahoe for $20,000, you might say, ‘It seems like it was painted nicely, but I think you should sell it for $19,000.'”

Supplying the buyer together with the report and inviting them to get an inspection, shows that you are not hiding anything, Varkey said. That goodwill might assist in the discussions, he said.

“You could not be more transparent,” Varkey said.

Disclose for relaxation?

Therefore, if the buyer does not request a history or inquire about mishaps, do you need to tell?

In Alberta, the Fair Trading Act says dealers can not misrepresent an automobile’s history — so if there has been an insurance claim on it, they need to inform you before you sign the contract. But that law does not apply to private sales.

“Private sales aren’t regulated,” said Cathy Housdorrf, spokeswoman for the Alberta Motor Vehicle Industry, the state’s motor vehicle regulator. “But if a dispute occurs, it’ll be a matter for the civil courts{}”

As a private seller, you are not required to volunteer your car’s been damaged in a crash, Iny stated.

“However, if requested by the vendor, they need to answer truthfully or they’d be responsible for the consequences,” he said. “In practice, [that is] difficult to perform.”

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Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

Hachi-roku: Honouring the Soul of Toyota’s celebrated 86??

01 Sep 17
Alibhai
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In Japan, the honouring of long-dead ancestors is an early and well-established tradition. Lanterns are lit, gravestones are cleansed ritually, and dancing and music welcome the spirits. People who have gone before are still a part of dailynbsp;life.

Which brings us tonbsp;badges.

On the steering wheel on the front fenders, and etched into the headlights of the bright orange Toyota (that is truly a Subaru, more on that in a bit) is the identical mysterious number: 86. In Japanese, the word for this number is hachi-roku, and it is almost a code word. If you came in a midnight gathering of Japanese car enthusiasts at one of the parking lots that dots the street circling Tokyo, you can immediately join the club by saying nothing else. Hachi-roku. Smiles. Nods ofnbsp;comprehension.

Even when Scion was about and this little coupe was known as the FR-S, it nonetheless had 86 composed on its fenders, as a tiny secret handshake to those in the know. To explain the relationship, we’ve summoned an ancestral soul by means of a 1985 Corolla. I understand “Corolla” does not seem very exciting, but hang on to yournbsp;hat.

This is Marvin Ng’s 1985 Corolla GT-S, which he bought for $1,800 in 2000, as a commuter for his first job in L.A.. It’s 305,000 miles on the odometer, and has been sitting in storage for the last couple of decades. As it is a Toyota, it startsnbsp;immediately.

Pop the hood latches open and have a look at the firewall, and you will immediately find the reason behind all this 86 company. There, stamped to steel, is the version code: AE86. In precisely the exact same manner that BMW fans throw around chassis codes such as E30 and E39 as shorthand, Toyota fans know this squared-off hatchback by its numericalnbsp;designation.

In fact, it’s more than simply the Toyota nuts that will have the ability to give you chapter and verse about the hachi-roku. The AE86 is carried high on the shoulders of Japanese automobile culture as a result of its appearance among the central characters in First D, a comedian that broke from Japan in 1995. In a time when monsters such as the third-generation Mazda RX-7 twin-turbo and the Mk IV Toyota Supra Turbo were flexing the might of pan-Pacific muscle, a tiny hatchback was slipping sideways to the imaginations ofnbsp;countless.

The story is pretty straightforward. Takumi Fujiwara is a disaffected teenager who delivers tofu daily in his black-and-white Sprinter Trueno (the Japanese version of the Corolla GT-S). Tricked into creating an almost supernatural driving ability on the winding passes of the fictional Mount Akina, he finally falls in with a bunch of road racers and beats the pants off all kinds of much more powerfulnbsp;machines.

As an underdog story, it has a charm that does not require that you understand anything about ball-bearing turbos or ceramic valve-springs. First D was first a manga (comic), then an anime collection, and finally spawned drivingnbsp;matches.

Ng’s carefully maintained and altered AE86 manages to catch the spirit of the iconic Initial-D vehicle, and is a fairly wonderful device in its own right. The chassis was fortified with cross-bracing and continues to be stitch-welded in areas for extra stiffness. A newer, 20-valve form of the first 4AGE 1.6L lookup engine was swapped in; it makes around 165 hp and revs to 8200nbsp;rpm.

With four throttle bodies and a 5.5 kg flywheel, the 86’s engine responds instantly to throttle inputs, and has insanely loud as the revs climb above 5,000 rpm or so. It is a little hooligan of a machine, with weighty unassisted steering and a close-ratio gearbox that feels fresh. Everything is a mechanical symphony of clicks and snicks and revs and g-forces. You can just imagine it hurtling down some narrow Japanese sea road in the dead ofnbsp;night.

There is nothing cartoonish about how this car feels. That is fitting, since the legend of the Corolla GT-S goes back farther than Japanese manga, and in the memories of older racing and rallynbsp;motorists.

In 1986, Bob Trinder and his co-driver John Moody handled the completely ridiculous Can-A-Mex rally at a softly prepared Corolla GT-S. The rally started in Vancouver, then hurried to Acapulco, Mexico, up to Anchorage, Alaska, then back to Vancouver, finishing in the Expo ’86 fairgrounds. It contained almost four weeks of racing over 25,000 kilometers of gravel and paved roads, pitting the little Toyota contrary to factory-backed teams such as a former ex-Safari Rallynbsp;winner.

“It was much like the Datsun 510,” states Trinder, speaking from his home in Vancouver. “Some cars come out of the box and they are just perfect. About two-thirds of the way along we were able to pull off the exhaust, but the engine never missed anbsp;conquer.”

They won.

With both racing pedigree and a pop culture after, it’s easy to see why the 86 is something Toyota chooses to observe. But times have changed, and turning a simple shoebox to a winner is not as simple as it once was. The recent Toyota 86 is a collaboration with Subaru, who builds the cars; the Subaru variant is only subtly different, badged as thenbsp;BRZ.

The Toyobaru twins, as some wag dubbed them came in 2011 surrounded with a whole lot of hype. A shame, as both cars served up only small performance figures. When run head-to-head against something such as a modern Civic Si, the front-wheel-drive car was really faster. Matters were even worse in Subaru showrooms, with the 270 hp WRX parked nearby, for not much morenbsp;cash.

Yet as I pull away and rev the 86’s flat-four engine up to extract the comparatively meagre torque on tap, I can not help feeling that the modern automobile honours the older one in the appropriate ways. It’s affordable. It’s somewhat tail-happy. The existence of back seats and a good trunk make it a more sensible choice than an MX-5. You may run it yearlong — I have driven one of them on snow tires and it was more entertaining than a one-horse open sleigh. There’s a enormous aftermarket to bulge grip levels, and it is a fantastic car for entrance to the track daynbsp;spectacle.

There are hardly any authentic hachi-roku around nowadays, with most having rusted away or been mistreated into bits. However, the 86’s soul still comes to visit from time to time. Light the lanterns. Time to gonbsp;dance.

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Courtesy: The Globe And Mail